“Purple Hibiscus”, analysis of the novel by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The idea

The purple hibiscus is a novel set in post-colonial Nigeria and follows the story of Kambili as she grapples with changes in her life. Having faced a brutal and tyrannical father her whole life, she soon realizes following a visit and stay at her Aunty’s place in Nsukka, that what she has considered being a way of life for her is not what life is supposed to be.

The purple hibiscus is a symbol of freedom and is a flower growing in Aunty Ifeoma’s garden, giving renewed hope to Kambili and Jaja. The characters in the novel are a representation of the new breed of people, with divergent beliefs and cultures in a new political era, all trying to address socio-political and cultural issues depending on how they have been molded. Continue reading

Posted in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“Native Son”, analysis of the novel by Richard Wright

In 1940, Richard Wright wrote the novel Native Son. This novel tells us about Bigger Thomas, a 20-year old uneducated, poor black man. One morning, he wakes up from his apartment of the Southern part of the city. He uses a skillet to kill a rat scampering across his room. Having grown up in an environment with harsh racial prejudice, Thomas is disturbed with a high conviction that he lacks control over his life and aspires nothing apart from low-wage labor. His mother pleads with him to accept a job offer from Mr
Dalton. However, Thomas instead decides to meet with his friends to plan the robbery of Mr Dalton’s shop. Continue reading

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“The Bell Jar”, analysis of the novel by Sylvia Plath

The Bell Jar is a novel first published in 1963. It was first released under a Pseudo author name of Victoria Lucas. In 1966 it was then published under the author’s real names; Sylvia Plath. The novel is a part biography depicting the life and times of a young woman who seemingly had a great life but suffered a mental breakdown but recovered later. The young woman was Esther Greenwood who hailed from Boston, Massachusetts. The main author of the book, committed suicide after the publication of the novel which took a similar turn as the main character in the novel. Continue reading

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“Love and Poverty”, analysis of the poem by Robert Burns

History of creation and publication

Burns’ first poems were published in James Johnson’s five-volume edition of The Scottish Musical Museum (1787–1797) and George Thomson’s four-volume edition of Selected Scottish Songs in the Original (1793–1805). The song “O Poortith Cauld and Restless Love”, widely known to the Russian-speaking reader under the title “Love and Poverty” (translated by S. Ya. Marshak), was obviously written in the late 1780s. The song “Love and Poverty” by Vladislav Kazenin became the smash hit in the USSR to the text by Burns / Marshak, performed by Alexander Kalyagin in the film “Hello, I Am Your Aunt” (based on Brandon Thomas’s play “Aunt Charlie”), which premiered in late 1975 year, in the new year prime time.

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“My heart`s in the Highlands”, analysis of the poem by Robert Burns

History of creation and publication

The poem (song) was written in 1790. Published in the five-volume edition of James Johnson’s “Scottish Museum of Music” (1787 – 1797).

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“The Nutcracker and the Mouse King”, analysis of the tale by Hoffmann

Well-known thanks to the ballet P.I. Tchaikovsky (1892) a fairy tale was written by E.T.A. Hoffmann in 1816. The name “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King” is associated with the plot basis of the work, built on the clash of two fairy kingdoms – Puppet and Mouse.

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Posted in Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann

“The Sandman”, analysis of the novel by Hoffmann

One of the most famous novel by E.T.A. Hoffmann was born in November 1815. The first edition of the work was slightly different from the second one, sent to the publisher Georg Reimer on November 24 and included in the collection of Night Stories in 1817: the devilish influence of Coppelius had a more comprehensive, physical nature and related not only to the main character – Nathanel, but also his beloved – Clara, who at first blinded by the touch of an old lawyer, and then died. Leaving Coppelius to work only on the soul of Nathanel, Hoffmann gave the novel great psychologicality and, at the same time, the inexplicable mysticism of what was happening.

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“Slaughterhouse-five”, analysis of the novel by Kurt Vonnegut

Introduction

The slaughterhouse-five is an anti-war novel published in 1969 by author Kurt Vonnegut. Kurt Vonnegut wrote this book after he survived the bombing in Dresden when he was a prisoner of war. Slaughterhouse-five is a text whose universal message is clear: that war must be avoided at all costs. It is dehumanizing and destructive. It is based on the personal experiences of the author. Continue reading

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“Fahrenheit 451″ by Ray Bradbury, analysis of the novel

The idea

It all starts with the story of a society of the utopian future in which books and reading are prohibited. Continue reading

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“Mrs Dalloway” by Virginia Woolf, analysis of the novel

The idea

It is a novel that deals with various topics, including feminism and madness, the first of them in the character of Clarissa and the second in Septimus Warren Smith. Continue reading

Posted in Virginia Woolf