Epic Theater of Bertolt Brecht

Bertolt Brecht was an outstanding reformer of Western theater, he created a new type of drama and a new theory, which he called “epic.”

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“Mother Courage and Her Children”, analysis of the play by Bertolt Brecht

The play is built in the form of a chain of paintings that depict individual episodes from the life of the second-Finnish warhead. Marketers were called merchants who accompanied troops on campaigns. Mother Courage has no illusions about the ideological background of the war and treats it extremely pragmatically – as a way of enrichment. She is completely indifferent to what flag to trade in her travel shop, the main thing is that the trade be successful. Courage also accustoms commerce to its children, who grew up in an endless war. Like any caring mother, she takes care that the war does not catch them. However, against her will, the war inexorably takes her two sons and a daughter. But, even having lost all the children, the marketer does not change anything in her life. As at the beginning of the drama, in the finale she stubbornly drags her shop.

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“Madame Bovary”, analysis of the novel by Gustave Flaubert

The novel “Madame Bovary” was based on the real story of the Delamar family, told to Flaubert by a friend – the poet and playwright Louis Buile. Eugene Delamard – a mediocre doctor from a remote French province, married in the beginning to a widow, and then to a young girl – became the prototype of Charles Bovary. His second wife, Delphine Couturier, languishing from bourgeois boredom, spending all her money on expensive outfits and lovers and committing suicide, formed the basis of the artistic image of Emma Rouault / Bovary. At the same time, Flaubert always emphasized that his novel is far from a documentary retelling of real history and the times even said that Madame Bovary does not have a prototype, and if there is, then he is the writer himself.

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“Salambo”, analysis of the novel by Gustave Flaubert

Flaubert began work on the novel “Salambo” immediately after the completion of “Madame Bovary,” exhausting him with descriptions of the French routine and lowland provincial customs. The writer turned to an oriental, exotic topic for Europe in order to improve his talent, which requires comprehensive artistic development.

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“The Vicar of Wakefield”, analysis of the story by Oliver Goldsmith

The moral, shrewd, and intelligent Oliver Goldsmith, the vicar of Wakefield lives a happy life with his household, which comprises the wife, Deborah, sons: George, Moses, Bill, and Dick, and daughters, Olivia and Sophia. The family lives a secluded and descent life. They are preparing for George’s marriage to an adorable girl, Miss Arabella Wilmot. Continue reading

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“Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded”, analysis of the novel by Samuel Richardson

The Idea

This  is a novel that published around 1740 by an English writer called Samuel Richardson. Many consider it to be a great English novel and it is reputed to have sold many copies when it was written. Continue reading

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“Tom Jones”, analysis of the novel by Henry Fielding

Henry Fielding, an astounding author born on the 22nd of April 1707, is most well-known for his literary masterpiece that is the book known as ‘The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling’. The intended comical book is known to be both a Bildungsroman, meaning a novel intended to deal with one’s spiritual education, and a picaresque novel, meaning a genre portraying a character that is rogue yet likeable. Continue reading

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“A Man’s A Man For A’ That”, analysis of the poem by Robert Burns

History of creation and publication

“Reading Burns,” S. Y. Marshak wrote, “we are surprised at his virtuoso poetic technique, and most importantly, how he could combine his careful work on the verse with the hard work of the farmer.” Moreover, Burns combined these two hard work all his life, starting from the age of 15. Lived in an adobe hut built by his father William. And yet honest poverty did not prevent William Burns from gathering villagers and proposing to open a school and hire teachers for village children for the money of their parents.

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“Wha Is That At My Bower-Door”, analysis of the poem by Robert Burns

History of creation and publication

The poem was written in the 1790s. Published in the five-volume edition of James Johnson’s “Scottish Museum of Music” (1787 – 1797).

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“My Love is like a red, red rose”, analysis of the poem by Robert Burns

History of creation and publication

The poem was written in 1794. Burns’ first poems were published in James Johnson’s five-volume edition of The Scottish Musical Museum (1787–1797) and George Thomson’s four-volume edition of Selected Scottish Songs in the Original (1793–1805). The poem has been repeatedly translated into Russian (T. L. Schepkina-Kupernik, S. Ya. Marshak, I. M. Ivanovsky, etc.).

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