Analysis of Fitzgerald’s “Absolution”

Absolution is a short story written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, one of America’s best known authors of the twentieth century. Even though it was included in the author’s 1926 collection of short stories titled “All the Sad Young Men”, it was first published two years earlier in 1924. Receiving generally positive reviews upon its release, it gained even more interest when Fitzgerald later released his best known novel, The Great Gatsby, because of the perceived connection of the two works. Continue reading

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“Babylon Revisited”, analysis of the story by Fitzgerald

Babylon Revisited is based of Fitzgerald’s real-life incident where his daughter, Scottie went to go live with his wife’s sister, Rosalind and her husband Newman. Fitzgerald was branded as the voice of the Jazz Age in the 1920’s with Zelda, his wife, famously known as the Last Flapper. They lived a lavish lifestyle which eventually led to Zelda being sent to a sanatorium in Switzerland. Rosalind then took Scottie as she felt that Fitzgerald was irresponsible and unfit to raise his daughter. Continue reading

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“Things fall apart”, analysis of the novel by Chinua Achebe

Introduction

Set in the village Umuofia in Nigeria, Things Fall Apart is a tale of the life of the Umuofia Clan told through Okonkwo a respected man in the tribe. It also chronicles the colonization of the village by the European missionaries and how the Igbo people were affected. The book provides an insight into the tradition and culture of Umuofia, Chinua shows that despite its struggles the village was functional. She aimed at criticizing the imperialism and painting a picture of how much colonization changed the lives of most African countries. Continue reading

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Analysis of “Anna Karenina” – parallelism in the composition of the novel

“Anna Karenina” begins with a phrase that is the psychological key of the work:
“All happy families are alike, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”
The pathos of the novel is not in the affirmation of spiritual unity between family members, but in the study of the destruction of families and human relationships.

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“After the Ball”, analysis of the story by Leo Tolstoy

The story by Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoy “After the Ball” is a bright protest against the unnaturalness of the inner world of a person who does not share good and evil. It is regret that it is impossible to find happiness in the world that generates this unnaturalness.

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“Childhood”, analysis of the novel by Leo Tolstoy

Childhood is a happy time in the life of every person. Indeed, in childhood everything seems bright and joyful, and any grief is quickly forgotten, as well as short resentment toward loved ones. It is not by chance that many works of Russian writers are devoted to this topic: “The childhood of Bagrov-grandson” by S. Aksakov, “Tyoma’s Childhood” by Garin-Mikhailovsky, “How the boys grew up” by E. Morozov and many other works.

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“Winter Dreams”, analysis of the story by Fitzgerald

Plot Summary

Winter dreams are considered to be one of Fitzgerald’s most accomplished short stories. Published in 1922, Winter Dreams is a play on the American Dreams ideal perpetuated in that era and is a study of class, aspirations and relationships and obsessions through infatuation. Continue reading

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“Gulliver’s Travels”, analysis of the novel by Jonathan Swift

“Traveling to some remote countries of the world in four parts: an essay by Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, and then a captain of several ships” is the full title of a satirical novel, conceived by Johnathon Swift in 1720 and released in 1725-26.

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“Robinson Crusoe”, analysis of the novel by Daniel Defoe

One of the most famous English novels first saw the light in April 1719. Its full name is “Life, the extraordinary and amazing adventures of Robinson Crusoe, a sailor from York, who lived 28 years in complete solitude on an uninhabited island off the coast of America near the mouths of the Orinoco river, where he was thrown by shipwreck, during which the entire crew of the ship, except him, died, outlining his unexpected release by pirates; written by himself “over time was reduced to the name of the protagonist.

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“Life is a Dream”, analysis of the play by Calderon

The famous play by Pedro Calderon de la Barca was first presented to the public in 1635. Created in the heyday of Spanish literature, it became one of the iconic works of its era. In it the playwright most fully revealed the true essence of human existence and nature. And he helped him in this, he developed a genre of religious and philosophical drama.

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